Category Archives: History

Manuscript found in Gulf Islands’ cabin, believed to be the work of Joseph Conrad

 

Joseph Conrad

Joseph Conrad

New owners of a Gulf Islands’ [British Columbia] property were intrigued to find part of an old manuscript when clearing out a cabin. On looking into previous ownership of the property it appears that it once belonged to relatives of Ford Madox Ford, a contemporary of Joseph Conrad, who had co-authored two novels with the famous writer. The couple is having the manuscript evaluated and on initial perusal the handwriting matches that of Joseph Conrad.

Download news item with partial text of the manuscript: Joseph_Conrad

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A chance to go back to ancient Egypt

Egyptian Museum, San Jose, CA

Egyptian Museum, San Jose, CA

The great historian and philosopher, Will Durant, complained that most of us spend too much time on the last 24-hours and too little time on the last 6,000 years.

It is ironic that in the heart of California’s Silicone Valley, whose industry is devoted very much to the future, there is an edifice honoring the 6,000-year-old civilization of the early Egyptians.

Mankind’s earliest great civilization developed about 6,000 years ago in the fertile Nile Valley. Because the soil was so bounteous those early Egyptians had time to think.

This social laboratory gave birth to mathematics, writing, music, art and architecture. An early Egyptian Pharaoh also first propounded monotheism.

The Egyptian Museum in San Jose, California, dates from 1932 and is a project of the Rosicrucian Order, which has its world headquarters and administrative center in the city.

Read the complete article: Egyptian_Museum

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New Mexico: The Land of Enchantment

 

Albuquerque Museum

Albuquerque Museum

The license plates bear the legend, “Land of Enchantment” and enchanting indeed is New Mexico. The Indian, Spanish and Anglo-American threads that subtly interweave to make up the state’s rich cultural tapestry all have contributed to the area’s food, music, religion, art and architecture.

Read complete article: New_Mexico

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Heard Museum highlights native art

The Heard Museum

The Heard Museum

When Maie and Dwight Heard arrived in Arizona from Chicago in 1895, Phoenix was just a small town in the desert.

The Heards quickly developed a deep appreciation for the native arts and culture and began collecting Southwest Indian art and artifacts. Their collection grew sufficiently large that, in 1929, they opened The Heard Museum to the public.

The two-hectare (five acres) outdoor area is a favorite spot for lunchtime picnics and the amphitheatre frequently hosts Native American dancers and musicians. Outdoor markets, sponsored by community arts groups, regularly occur on the J. Lester Shaffer Memorial Green, which is adorned by beautiful bronze statues by internationally acclaimed Apache sculptor, Allan Houser.

There’s evidence of human settlement in the US Southwest dating back 17,000 years. The Heard Museum’s permanent collection contains the most extensive exhibit in North America of these people and their cultural and artistic achievements.

Read complete article: Heard_Museum

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A rainbow blend of cultures

RainbowYonder, yonder the fair rainbow,

See the rainbow brightly decked and painted!

Now the swallow bringeth glad news to your corn…

      • Zuni corn-grinding song

The rainbow, with its auspicious blending of colors, is the harbinger of good fortune in many cultures. This is especially true of the native tribes in the rain-starved areas of the American southwest.

It’s the rainbow-like blending of cultures – native American, Spanish and Anglo-American – that enhances the “land of enchantment,” the state of New Mexico.

Read the complete article: Rainbow-of-Cultures

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Swedish Past Survives in Kalmar Keep

Kalmar Castle

Kalmar Castle

“From here indeed/Shall we strike terror in the Swede;/And here a city, by our labour/Founded, shall gall our haughty neighbour.”

Thus declared Pushkin‘s character in The Bronze Horseman, written in 1833 about Peter the Great‘s founding of St. Petersburg in 1703. The quote is indicative of the degree of suspicion and hostility that had plagued the Baltic since the 11th century.

Read the complete article: Kalmar

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Hampstead Houses Hold History

 

Freud Museum, Hampstead, London

Freud Museum, Hampstead, London

In the hilltop North London village of Hampstead, already crammed with old world wonders, a little bit of Old Vienna has been recreated at 20 Maresfield Gardens.

The 82-year-old Sigmund Freud, a refugee from Nazi Germany, settled here in 1938, achieving a lifelong ambition to become an Englishman. After arriving in England he explained to author H.G. Wells: “Indeed you cannot have known that since I first came to England as a boy of 18 years, it became an intense wish fantasy of mine to settle in this country and become an Englishman.”

Read the complete article: Freud_Museum

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